Eleanor, Quiet No More

Eleanor, Quiet No More

The first book that caught my eye when I saw the display for Women In History at the local library last month was Eleanor, Quiet No More: The Life of Eleanor Roosevelt written by Doreen Rappaport and illustrated by Gary Kelley.  The cover is a gorgeous painting of Eleanor Roosevelt, that looks like a photograph.  What's more, it looks like Eleanor is looking at the reader right in the eyes.

If a book cover is an adverstisement, Eleanor, Quiet No More delivers its promises from its the get-go. Doreen Rappaport does a thorough and engaging job of telling us about Eleanor's life story and important moments, and even starts at her childhood so we can better understand where she is coming from.

I confess that I didn't know that much about Eleanor Roosevelt before reading this book, only that she was a well-regarded person in history.  Now I understand more as Rappaport takes us through her accomplishments as a champion for women and minority rights in the United States, but also as someone who cared for and fought for the poor and child laborers in the time of the Great Depression. 

Throughout this picture book biography, Rappaport highlights some of Eleanor Roosevelt's famous quotes.  Each page is accompanied by Kelley's beautifully-rendered and haunting portraits. It's a gorgeous picture book, much befitting the caliber of work that Eleanor Roosevelt accomplished in her lifetime. A definite must-read picture book.

Tell Dr. Bookworm

As I asked before with my recommendation of Different Like Coco, who is a woman in history you'd like to hear more about? Is there one who needs to be written about in picture book format for younger kids?

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Seb and the Sun

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